Listen free English grammar audio lessons online

Listening skills are an important part of effective communication. We recommend you to actively listen to the free English grammar audio lessons provided.  The audio lessons describe the correct usage of some of the commonly used terms in English. It will help you to avoid the most common mistakes people do in English.

Use of Above and Over

Above and over, both means ‘higher than’. Above is usually used when there is no movement and over is used when we talk about movement or position. Above is preferred when one thing is not directly over another.

On the other hand,

When we talk about something that completely covers another thing, we use over. They can be touching the thing below or not.

We also use over when talking about movement across from one side to the other. Over is also used with periods of time and numbers.

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Use of At, In and On

At, In and On are prepositions and are used before words or phrases expressing point of time or position. At is used to show an exact time or period of time and also to describe the specific position or location as a point

Usually we use in to refer to something or somebody “inside” a place. In is also used when we talk about the specific months, years, seasons, centuries and longer period of time.

On is used to refer to a specific position on any surface.

It also refers specific days and dates.

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Use of Can and Could

can and could are modal auxiliary verbs. We use can in following scenarios:

  1. To talk about ‘Ability’.
  2. To talk about ‘Possibility’.
  3. To ask for and give ‘Permission’ informally.
  4. In offers, Requests and Instructions.

Could is used as the past equivalent of can. That means ‘could’ is used as past tense of ‘can’ in all scenarios applicable to can. For examples:

  1. I could swim when I was younger.
  2. I couldn’t find her anywhere.

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Use of Do and Make

When we talk about any action, obligation, and repetitive task, we use Do at that time

  1. I want to do something.
  2. I don’t know what to do.

When we talk about creating or producing something and for actions we choose to do, we prefer to use the word ‘Make’.

  1. I made a breakfast for the family.
  2. Would you like me to make you a cup of tea?

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Use of For and Since

We use For and Since when talking about time. For is used before a period of time. We can use it with all tenses whether it is past, present or future.

For examples:

  1. I study for two hours every day.
  2. We have been studying for three hours.

Since is used before a specific time or date or point of time. Since is normally used with perfect tenses.

For examples:

  1. You have been here since 10 am.
  2. She has been working since she arrived.

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Use of If and When

When and If are two words, people often get confused about. When and if are both used to refer to a time of a future situation or condition. We use when to refer to the time of a future situation or a condition that we are certain about. We use if to introduce a possible or unreal situation or condition.

For examples:

  1. I will be able to see you in the evening when I get off work.
  2. I will be able to see in the evening if I get off work.

Here when and if, both are used in the same sentence but there is a certain difference.

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Use of May and Might

May and might are modal auxiliaries. We use may to ask for permissions. This is more formal but not used very often in modern spoken English.

For examples:

  1. May I borrow your book?
  2. May I come in?

Might is often used to suggest a less possibility of something than may.

For examples:

  1. It might rain today.
  2. I might not come with you.

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Use of Till and Untill

Until and Till are another pair of words in English people often make mistakes. It is often found that the words till and until are used as preposition or conjunction.

Till and until have the same meaning and are used interchangeably. Till is generally considered to be the more informal and occurs less frequently than until in writing.

For examples:

  1. Wait until the doctor sees her.
  2. I’ll stay here till you come back.

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Use of Who and Whom

Who and whom are interrogative pronouns.

Who is used to replace the subject and whom is used to replace the object of a sentence.

For example:

Who wrote the letter?

Now let’s take an example to understand how to use whom.

Whom should I vote for?

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